What’s Your Dewey? 629.28 Driving Me To Distraction!

Next Week’s Start-up Mondays presentation on staying safe on the roads (presented by SAPOL), got me thinking about books that may have been written on the topic.

My first catalogue search on the topic ‘Driver Education’ yielded just one title Young drivers and road safety edited by Justin Healey. An Australian publication, it addresses the topic of young driver safety as a Social Issue (and consequently places the title in both the 360s and 629.28). The book states that despite an increase in Driver education in our schools, young people have a higher representation in road accidents and fatalities than any other group.  This book presents the latest attitudes, statistics and reports on road safety in Australia and examines the risk behaviours of young drivers. Aimed at educating young people and learner drivers, it contains a range of factsheet-style advice on how to avoid risks and increase personal road safety awareness.

Driver Distraction: Theory, Effects, and Mitigation edited by Michael A. Regan, John D. Lee, Kristie Young outlines the underlying theory of distraction, its effects on driving performance and safety, and strategies for mitigating these effects. It considers major sources of distraction both inside and outside the vehicle (communication devices and driver support systems); reviews factors that mediate the effects of distraction (age and driver experience); and outlines ergonomic guidelines, for minimizing driver distraction. Aimed at those working in transport related industries, the book provides some valuable insights for any driver interested in personal safety. You can preview the book here: www.crcpress.com/Driver-Distraction-Theory-Effects-and-Mitigation

Behavioural Adaptation and Road Safety: Theory, Evidence and Action, edited by Christina Rudin-Brown & Samantha Jamson, looks at the impact ageing has on drivers and the way changes to automobile and road engineering have impacted on driver safety for this group. A team of international experts in the field of transportation related behaviour sciences, address the issue of driver characteristics and the way they adapt to changes in their physical acumen, road conditions and vehicular developments. The book aims to provide easy-to-understand solutions for road safety intervention design. With a target audience of researchers and academics, this book is available through Google books in print and ebook format.

Be a confident driver by John Henderson.
Suitable for almost every motorist, it covers not only the basics but includes advanced driving techniques, and introduces mental strategies such as observation. Techniques for practical driving examples include bad weather driving and breakdowns, and tips for driving on rural roads, motorways and urban roads. The book includes supporting resources and further reading, and is designed as a motorist’s companion.

How to Drive: The Ultimate Guide – from the Man Who Was The Stig by Ben Collins
Former Top Gear star Ben Collins uses his extensive experience and knowledge to ‘tell you all of the things you didn’t learn on your [driving] test’ With wit and wisdom backed by illustrations and thought-provoking anecdotes, skills described include skid control and gear changes that top racing drivers take for granted. ‘The ultimate book for anyone who wants to be better at something they do every day of their life’.

Road safety by Christie Marlowe is a U.S.A. publication that attempts to alert children to the dangers of inattentive or inappropriate road use. The four sections of the book include real life examples of road safety issues, information on what makes roads dangerous and suggestions for staying safe on and around roads.  Preview here: http://bit.ly/2sTTAsp

 

Driverless : intelligent cars and the road ahead by Hod Lipson and Melba Kurman.
Although driving is often routinely repetitive and reactive (something robotics is known to excel at), it is also unpredictable and ‘commands complex social communication between other drivers and pedestrians'(chapter 1). These qualities alone make the task of designing driver-less cars difficult and challenging – software is not yet capable of responding as quickly and often seamlessly to unpredictable situations as the human brain (despite our want for distraction). The book points out that the development of software that can provide reliable artificial perception is still some time away, however there is a clear indication that anyone, at any time, could make that leap that not only makes the driver-less car more universally possible, it makes it likely. You can preview the book here: http://bit.ly/2sEOlL9
Nola Cavallaro

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