Author Archives: Nola

How Does That Work? Tech Savvy 1on1 Help Sessions

So this week, by popular demand, we’ve relaunched our Tech Savvy 1on1 Help Sessions.  That’s excellent you say! So what are they and how do they work?
Well, have you been wanting to understand your device better?  Maybe you’d like to check out some of the eBooks and eAudiobooks that the library has available, but are unsure of the process?  That’s where we come in.  Every fortnight for eight weeks from Wednesday the 27th September, we will have three sessions available for our customers to book in to at the Evanston Gardens Library.  You will need your device/s, your app store login details and your library membership details, then we’ve got forty minutes to go through your queries!
Previous attendees have said they love the atmosphere in the library, the staff are patient, friendly and explain things clearly when going through the different processes. One lady had the Facebook app downloaded onto her tablet, but did not know how to post to create the conversations she saw happening among her family and friends.  We went through the process and what each part meant, culminating in a library selfie and her first Facebook post! That illustrates the reason these sessions exist.  We have heard from many community members and library customers that they want to participate in the digital world around them but lack the confidence and knowledge to progress with their devices.  
We hope to assist our attendees with; basic tablet and smartphone skills; accessing the library’s eCollection; understanding the security measures of your device; learning the steps to update your device’s operating system and using the WiFi.  
If any of these topics sound like something you’d be interested in, please give our library staff a call and book into one of the available sessions.  We have 12 forty minute sessions available on Wednesdays (27 September, 11 & 25 October and 08 November) at the Evanston Gardens Branch Library at 9:15am, 10:00am and 10:45am.  We’re looking forward to helping you get more out of your devices and the digital world around us.

 

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Tech Savvy: A-Z Apps Series – Lifestyle and Leisure

Au Coffee Summer Pleasure Holidays Leisure

So you’ve got yourself some free time, what are you going to do with it?  What’s your go-to activity when you have the time? Do you like to veg in front of the television and binge watch your favourite shows? Do you prefer to take the time to meditate, clear your head and breathe or do you like to get up and do something physical?  There are so many apps available to assist you with how to spend your free time, we’ve included a small list below of some of our favourites.  Have a look and let us know if there’s a great app you use to help you chill out, relax and have fun.

Geocaching – https://www.geocaching.com/play Available on the Apple iTunes App Store and Google Play as a FREE download, but with optional in-app purchases.  It’s treasure hunting for adults but can include the whole family! Like to get out in the great wide world but need the motivation to keep walking? If you’ve got a phone, you can locate these little hidden treasures all over the world.  Some are very difficult to find, others are much easier.  As you progress, you will get better and without trying, you will get a workout for your mind and your body, out and about in the fresh air.

Smiling Mind – https://smilingmind.com.au/  Available on the Apple iTunes App Store and Google Play as a FREE download. Developed by psychologists and educators by a not-for-profit organisation to increase mindfulness at home, at school, at the workplace, for sportspeople, everyone! It includes many features like different programs for different people and ages, tracking functionality to review progress, and varying durations so you can fit it in to your day regardless of how busy you are.


Breathe
– An Apple Watch app (included with operating system) that monitors your breathing. A quick way to take a few moments from your busy day to focus on your breathing, relax, and increase your mindfulness.

TV when you want it,  is what’s happening more and more now, and there are so many different providers to choose from for your next great binge watch! Some of these are free, some require a subscription to access the services, all have hours of great content to watch!  Game of Thrones marathon anyone?…

Netflix (https://www.netflix.com/app)

STAN (https://www.stan.com.au/)

Fetch (https://www.iinet.net.au/tv/fetch/app/)

YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/)

iView (http://iview.abc.net.au/support/where-to-get-iview)

Foxtel Anywhere (https://www.foxtel.com.au/foxtel-app.html)

TenPlay (https://tenplay.com.au/apps)

PLUS7 (https://au.tv.yahoo.com/plus7/mobile/get-the-app/)

9NOW (https://www.9now.com.au/ways-to-watch)

SBS On Demand (https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/faqs)

Since Colouring-in Books have become very popular recently, they have been made into multiple types of apps that you can download and use on the go without requiring pencils, textas or other colouring mediums.  You can find many from your app store by searching for colouring (or coloring) book for iTunes and click the link for a collection of apps available.  For Google Play we’ve included the following link for you to browse the available colouring-in apps (https://play.google.com/store/search?q=coloring%20book&c=apps&hl=en).

Podcast apps like Pocket Casts (https://play.pocketcasts.com/) and Podcasts (Apple iOS) (https://www.apple.com/au/itunes/podcasts/) have been very popular for catching up with any subject you’re interested in.  News, health, comedy, radio, interviews, crafting, ted talks, sports, true crime and entertainment are all catered for by thousands of hosts happy to discuss the world around them.  Listening to podcasts is a great idea for people when they are on the go, relaxing, at the gym, on your lunch break and more. Easy to download from your app store, then browse through the categories to find something that takes your fancy.  If you enjoy it, then subscribe to it and when there’s a new episode you’ll get a notification.

So a nice quick list and we’ll not take up anymore of your time.  Go, relax, enjoy your free time!  However you spend it.

Post Contributor: Melinda Kennedy

 

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Tech Savvy 1on1 Digital Help Sessions Back by Popular Demand!

What’s Your Dewey? 640s Food: For Thought or Sustenance?


Food: We have too much and too little; it’s too sweet or too fatty; there aren’t enough vitamins, or minerals, or fibre; it’s wonderful to look at, or not; great to eat, or not; we can’t avoid it and we love to romance it. Whatever your relationship with food, there is no doubt that if you have the luxury of choice, you are always on the lookout for something to tease, tempt and tantalize.

Despite today’s plethora of ebooks and apps on the topic of food (see our previous Tech Savvy A-Z of Apps article), cookbooks are still in high demand as any visit to a book store or the 640 shelves in a public library will confirm. With so many reading choices, I decided to take an eclectic look at the titles available and came up with this brief selection.


There comes a time each year when my chooks are enthusiastically doing what chooks do so well… lay eggs. Consequently, I am always on the look out for new ways with eggs. How to boil an egg by Rose Bakery (aka Rose Carrarini) is a collection of simple and unusual recipes from renowned English chef Rose Carrarini’s Rose Bakery.  Recipes highlight the versatility of eggs and include both classic and contemporary approaches – basics like poached, scrambled and fried; to muffins, pancakes, tarts, gratins, cakes and puddings. While not completely inspiring with adventuresome recipes, there are certainly some good options to try. What others have said…
“A treasury of scrambled, fried, baked, poached and more.”—Country & Town House
“Heralding a new era of egg loving… An egg odyssey… Beautiful.”—Metro

Anyone who has ever tried to grow their own and succeeded will know that beans are boom or bust garden produce. Beans: A History by Ken Albala looks at the fascinating history of this early human cultivar in its many forms, and the way it has underpinned the development of diverse cultures throughout history. Bloomsbury.com says of it: ‘The humble bean has always attracted attention – from Pythagoras’ notion that the bean hosted a human soul to St. Jerome’s indictment against bean-eating in convents (because they “tickle the genitals”), to current research into the deadly toxins contained in the most commonly eaten bean’. Graced with 55 intriguing and tempting recipes from around the world, the book makes a great addition to cookbook lists.
You can preview the book here: http://bit.ly/2wuWx4b


While the bean is well recognised as a great ‘old world’ food in our modern kitchens, it is not by any means the only ancient food source to consider when looking at revitalising our food understanding. The oldest foods on Earth : a history of Australian native foods, with recipes by John Newton, ‘looks at the flora and fauna that nourished the Aboriginal peoples for over 50,000 years. It is because European Australians have hardly touched these foods for over 200 years that I am writing it’  says Newton. Newton argues we need to eat different foods: ‘foods that will help to reconcile us with the land and its first inhabitants’. There is increasing acceptance of traditional Australian ingredients with kangaroo, quondong, muntries and a large variety of Australian seafood being examples of foods that are now considered standard fare. Contributing chefs like Peter Gilmore, Maggie Beer and sous chef Beau Clugston, make a convincing argument for native food inclusion in our restaurants but I can’t help but think it also needs a less ‘haute cuisine’ approach, if it is to herald a ‘new food revolution’.

Of course some ancient foods require a lot more encouragement than others. In its revised form, The eat-a-bug Cookbook by David George Gordon, does much to encourage us to take a more unbiased approach to bug-eating. Bugs are plentiful and rich in protein and have other beneficial nutrients, points out naturalist chef David George Gordon. Gordon also likes to stress that ‘bug-eating is fun, exciting, and downright delicious!’ Entomophagy (or bug-eating) is enthusiastically explored with instructions on DIY home-grown harvests and recipes to tempt adventurous epicurians. How about these ideas to tempt your flagging taste buds? Orthopteran Orzo—pasta salad with a cricket-y twist, Deep-Fried Tarantula and White Chocolate and Wax Worm Cookie. You needn’t take my word of course – take a peak inside here: http://amzn.to/2vVOZUe

Of course the Australian answer to all food dilemnas is to simply – throw it on the barbie! The Aussie BBQ bible : 100+ recipes for the great outdoors by Oscar Smith aims to help you get the most out of your barbie, regardless of type, sophistication or simplicity. Chapters include how to barbecue most meats (chicken, beef, lamb, pork and seafood), but also a generous helping of barbecuing recipes for vegetarians and dessert fans.
 So… how do you cook a chicken if not on a barbecue? According to its dedicated website, Fifty Shades of Chicken by F. L. Fowler is a ‘spoof in a cookbook …A parody in three acts – “The Novice Bird” (easy recipes for roasters), “Falling to Pieces” (parts perfect for weeknight meals), and “Advanced Techniques” (the climax of cooking)’. Despite the ‘saucy’ approach to recipe delivery Fifty Shades of Chicken offers fifty dishes that will boost your repertoire. I will leave you with a recipe quote: ‘Dripping Thighs ….  as he coats my thighs with sticky liquid I can hardly contain myself. Tempted? You can visit the website here: http://www.fiftyshadesofchicken.com/#
 When my brain fails and I simply can’t think of a thing I want to eat or prepare, I turn to logic – What’s in my cupboard? What’s in my fridge? What’s in my where-with-all? Perhaps I need a clone… or a robot to cook? Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson: A Computer-Generated Cookbook from IBM & the Institute of Culinary Education is IBM’s attempt at a logical approach to just this dilemma. ‘IBM’s Jeopardy star “Watson” tries its circuitry at something better than trivia – cooking… in a creative attempt to break free of culinary ruts and open the minds of chefs to new flavor combinations.’ Tens of thousands of recipes, flavor profiles, the chemical composition of foods, have all been input into Watson to deliver a plethora of computer-generated recipes. Sections include home cooking, travel cooking, restaurant fare and cocktails. Although it has a slight USA bias in its approach to food, it does offer interesting ideas.  An abebooks.com review says of it ‘a perfect example of the science behind cooking.’ Of course there is a website: www.ibmchefwatson.com/community  … and an app.
You can view an example here  http://amzn.to/2gNHNrq

Nola Cavallaro

Sources:
http://www.abebooks.com
au.phaidon.com
http://www.bloomsbury.com
http://www.booktopia.com.au
Kate Colquhoun, http://www.theguardian.com
http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-fo-cookbooks-20161026-story.html
mentalfloss.com
http://www.newsouthbooks.com.au
http://www.tastemade.com

Start-up Mondays @ 10.30am Sept-Nov Program

The Library is pleased to announce the release of the September to November Start-up Mondays adult learning and information program.
See the program below for details.