Category Archives: Teen

Start-up Monday

Come along next Monday to our information session presented by the Gawler Regional Natural Resource Centre – Evanston Gardens Library, 65 Angle Vale Road, Evanston Gardens at 10.30am. No bookings required.

Adelaide Plains Poets Chapter and Verse October 2017

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What’s Your Dewey? 781 It’s All M.m.usic To My Ears…

Strictly speaking, 781 should get you books on the general principles of music and musical forms, but realistically, you will also find titles devoted to individual performers, bands and concerts. Being a bit of a purist, and genuinely interested on the assigned topic, I scanned the virtual shelves (the catalogue) to see what I could find.

The first title to attract my attention questioned my understanding of musical forms – I had always thought an audial relationship with music was intrinsic, and Air Guitar, A user’s guide by Bruno MacDonald did not strike me as a musical form. Perhaps it had something to say about the general principles of music?


Perhaps not. By way of introduction, the book states:  ‘Freddie Mercury did it. Hormone-addled adolescents do it. Grown men do it in the privacy of their own homes (and, sometimes, in dark public gatherings). There are even specialist computer games that encourage you to do it. It is air guitar.’ Clearly designed to attract attention,  what follows is more of a comic-style picture book than a serious attempt at discussing a musical form. The book is divided into three sections: Getting started, which includes basic accessories, (there are accessories?) and the Dos and Donts (…the general principles!);  Air Guitar Moves, which explains 12 moves including ‘The Hendrix’; and Going Pro, with ’50 fret fondling favourites’. The book is sparse on content, laid out like a storyboard complete with sketchy coloured line drawings…not exactly definitive but bound to attract the growing number of devotees.

Clearly, Air Guitar is part of the music scene. When looking at what else might be included as part of ‘the scene’, I came across a series of books aimed at teens and young adults called The Music Scene.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Annis, author and journalist who has spent many years working within the music industry, has created this series of four titles that looks at the world of contemporary music. The Music Industry, The History of Modern Music, Music Fashion & Style and Performing Live, are easy to read and full of practical tips based on case studies featuring some of the world’s best known contemporary musical artists. Although slim, each title is packed with useful information. Published by Franklin Watts in 2012, the series is starting to date (as things quickly do in the pop industry) but many of the principles behind the how-to advice are relevant today.

Still on the hunt for titles on musical forms, Jazz : a beginner’s guide by Stuart Nicholson revived my hope that I am looking in the right place.


Like many, I have some preconceived (and potentially erroneous) ideas about what constitutes Jazz. A quick browse through this title, reassures me that Jazz is what I thought it to be, but also a lot more. Nicholson takes readers through Jazz early history in southern USA to modern jazz scenes around the world. He talks about the evolution of the word and concept that Jazz encompasses and the way that many listeners are predisposed to understanding it because of its close links to other mainstream forms such as blues, rock and roll and pop. The eleven chapters include The Blues, The American Popular Song, Rise of the Big Bands, Jazz Goes Modern  and Jazz in the Global Village. Each chapter is accompanied by a play list based on the form and style being discussed. You can take a peak inside here: Jazz-Beginners-Guide-Guides

Classical music is another form that has suffered from ‘bad press’ being labelled elitist and boring… but… What if it only took half a minute to better understand and appreciate what it is after all, the most freely available form of music: as background music, on the internet, in the media and used in some of our most famous jingles?


30-second classical music : the 50 most significant genres, composers and innovations, each explained in half a minute
edited by Joanne Cormac is one book that promises to deliver just that! In his forward, David Pickard says ‘The book proves that it is possible to be brief, succinct and insightful without being patronising or simplistic… every significant development [in the history of classical music] seems to be covered.’ In writing this book, Joanne Cormac’s aim is to dispel some of the myths surrounding classical music, to demystify some of the jargon and to open it up to a broader audience. The seven sections of the book take readers on a journey through the earliest instruments and monastic plainchant to the electronic music of modern composition. Each section has a glossary and the text is clearly laid out and nicely illustrated to encourage browsing and return visits. Not a book you have to consume in one sitting, but you could.
You can preview the book here: 30-Second-Classical-Music

There is always the danger when books try to simplify ideas and concepts that they will offend potential readers by ‘talking down’ to them. The  books ...for Dummies series makes no attempt to disguise the fact that they assume readers have little or no knowledge of the topic at hand. Music theory for dummies by Michael Pilhofer and Holly Day is no exception.


Like many titles in the series, the book takes readers back to the basics: Note values and counting, Treble and Bass clefs, Time signatures, Tempo and Tone, Key signatures, Scales and  chords are all included with Music theory’s history an added bonus that puts it all in perspective. The book is well structured and easy to follow. It provides examples of music to compliment the text, chord charts and audio examples on CD (piano and guitar). It also has a companion website that you can visit here: http://www.dummies.com/go/musictheory

Although not exactly a musical form, the music that consistently attracts audiences is music that includes a combination of voice and inspiring lyrics – collectively known as ‘songs’. 

First published in 2005, 1001 songs you must hear before you die edited by Robert Dimery has become one of the most popular musical go-to reference books, listing some of the world’s most famous popular songs beginning early 20th century. Each featured song title includes its unique backstory with illustrations, and is placed in context of time and musical influences (with similar genre-titles included). A range of music journalists have also contributed to the book. Although heavily biased toward music from the USA, the list includes titles in French, Spanish, Italian and German. An easy to browse book, that has been consistently updated with the latest release in 2016. You can also sample song titles based on the book online at: http://playlists.net/1001-songs-you-must-hear-before-you-die-4 

There is no doubt that music plays an important part in our lives. Neurologists, scientists, doctors and teachers agree that exposure to music at an early age has positive benefits for life: positive for early childhood development; for our schooling and education; for our health and well being and ultimately, for our longevity. Music therapy is increasingly being incorporated in medicine to assist with pain management, healing and recovery and mental and emotional resilience.


Music remembers me : connection and wellbeing in dementia
by Kirsty Beilharz  aims to address both the practitioner and those without experience or training, looking for ‘quick start’ guidelines. Beilharz makes strong links between the mind and music engagement for dementia sufferers, and provides practical advice on introducing music to their daily care. The book includes moving stories from Australian health and aged care providers HammondCare and is considered a ground-breaking book on the topic.
You can view the book-launch trailer here: Music Remembers Me

So, it seems that there is much to learn about musical principles and forms in the 781s (with a little Dewey perseverance and leeway given) and… the next time that song or piece of music gets stuck in my head and just won’t go away? I’ll just assume its all for the best!
Nola Cavallaro

Overdrive – New Reading History Feature

Exciting News for Overdrive Users!
Overdrive now has a Reading History feature. When you borrow an item it will be automatically added to your history. You can also add titles manually. All the instructions are on their help page here: http://bit.ly/2g7O3XJ

Overdrive History Feature

Tech Savvy: A-Z Apps Series – Music


So we’ve obviously come a long way since playing records was the only way to put together a playlist of our favourite tunes. We can now have a personal rock concert, symphony orchestra, dance party or chill out session at our finger tips and playing just for us, owing to the many options for headphones available on the market.


Whether you’re at the gym, on your daily commute, studying or just generally trying to tune out the world, there are many options for you to listen to your favourites, something new or something to get you fired up for your PT session. What’s your go-to music app? Do you have any pros or cons that made the decision for you?


Many music streaming services have popped up and disappeared over the last 5 years. With such a new way of tuning into your music there have been many ideas explored to bring streaming services to the consumer. When using the streaming services on your mobile phone you will need to check whether your data allowance is adequate or if that service is included in your phone’s data plan, otherwise you’ll find you’re out of data before your month has barely begun. Many music artists have added their titles to some or all of these services. If your music collection is looking a little dated and you’re keen to try something new we’ve highlighted some of the more popular streaming services below.

Spotify:  https://www.spotify.com/au/ is a great way to get some music on the go without needing to organise it yourself. Download your app, sign up (free or premium accounts) and hit play. There are restrictions to the free account that might make you consider the paid version. If you don’t mind the ads and don’t usually skip your songs then you’ll find the free version is fine for you. Spotify gives you access to millions of songs to create your own playlists and as one of the most used music streaming services in the world, you may even find your bestie’s fave playlist or a playlist compiled by your favourite artist.


Apple Music
: https://www.apple.com/au/music/ The streaming music service created by Apple for their customers, synced across all their devices they have logged into with their Apple ID. Apple Music is a paid subscriptions only service to give users an extra 40 million songs to their own library, with different prices for students, individuals or families. Create your own playlist or get Apple Music to create something for you based on your music preferences. Connect your Apple devices to play your selections through your iPhone, Apple Watch or their upcoming Home pod. You can also move your playlists to your device to limit your data usage and listen offline.

iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/ Launched in Australia during 2013 this recommender system radio station has multiple music stations and offers free, ‘Plus’ and ‘All Access’ subscription services. Available on many devices including home and automotive smart systems. Also, using the All Access Services means you will be able to save live broadcasts to your digital playlists to get more bang for your buck.

Shazam: https://www.shazam.com/ is an application used to recognise the music and TV that is playing near you. Starting out as a text messaging service, it has evolved into a way music artists can keep fans up to date with their latest music offerings and their music tastes. By holding your open app up to the music playing locally, it will ‘listen’ and check against the database of songs, artists and albums to return information to you about track details, artist information, lyrics, videos, concert tickets etc. So the next time you’re walking through somewhere wondering ‘that song is really good, I wonder what it is?’ …you can now answer that question and find your next favourite artist, song or album.

Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/store/music?hl=en Just like some of the previous options, you have a choice of paid or free subscriptions to access the music service. The paid subscription service will also give subscribers ad-free access to YouTube Red, the premium offering from YouTube. There is an Offline Mixtape functionality for you to listen offline to your playlists. And if you’re not sure what to listen to next, you can mix your own library with the radio stations and get an eclectic mix. Don’t like the current song? You can skip unlimited times with their paid ‘All Access’ pass. Would you like to know what that song is playing near you right now? Google Play Music has a Shazam style ‘identify what’s playing’ option which will connect you with the music, artist and anything available on YouTube for you to watch.

So it comes down to whether you want to keep your favourite tunes or just listen to what takes your fancy at the time. Do you want all the bells and whistles that come with the paid subscriptions or are you just happy to have any music to listen to? Do you mind ads appearing in between your songs, like a radio station, or are you looking to get away from the radio and just have music? All these are great questions for deciding on a music streaming service, and luckily, most services have a great intro price or free service model for you to test them. What is your go-to music service? Are you intrigued and want to give it a try? Let us know what you think!
Melinda Kennedy

Tech Savvy 1 on 1

Our popular Tech Savvy 1 on 1 Sessions are proving popular, with only a few spaces left for October and November. Call 8522 0123 to reserve a Digital Help Session.

Tech Savvy 1on1 Digital Help Flyer 2 (changed by Lyn)